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a crying boy

Childhood Adversity Increases Risk For Depression And Chronic Inflammation

When a person injures their knee, it becomes inflamed. When a person has a cold, their throat becomes inflamed. This type of inflammation is the body’s natural and protective response to injury. Interestingly, there is growing evidence that a similar process happens when a person experiences psychological trauma. Unfortunately, this type of inflammation can be destructive.

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prescription medication

Atypical Antipsychotic More Effective Than Older Drugs In Treating Childhood Mania, But Side Effects Can Be Serious

The antipsychotic medication risperidone is more effective for initial treatment of mania in children diagnosed with bipolar disorder compared to other mood stabilizing medications, but it carries the potential for serious metabolic side effects, according to an NIMH-funded study published online ahead of print January 2, 2012, in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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children in class

Physical Activity And School Performance May Be Linked

A systematic review of previous studies suggests that there may be a positive relationship between physical activity and the academic performance of children, according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The study was undertook by Amika Singh, Ph.D., of the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues.

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MRI of the brain

Maltreated Children Show Same Pattern Of Brain Activity As Combat Soldiers

Children exposed to family violence show the same pattern of activity in their brains as soldiers exposed to combat, new research has shown. In the first functional MRI brain scan study to investigate the impact of physical abuse and domestic violence on children, scientists at UCL in collaboration with the Anna Freud Centre, found that exposure to family violence was associated with increased brain activity in two specific brain areas (the anterior insula and the amygdala) when children viewed pictures of angry faces.

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Sarah E. Anderson, PhD

Quality Of Mother-Toddler Relationship Linked To Teen Obesity

The quality of the emotional relationship between a mother and her young child could affect the potential for that child to be obese during adolescence, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed national data detailing relationship characteristics between mothers and their children during their toddler years. The lower the quality of the relationship in terms of the child’s emotional security and the mother’s sensitivity, the higher the risk that a child would be obese at age 15 years, according to the analysis.

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a troubled teenage girl

Group Programs To Prevent Childhood Depression Prove To Be Effective

Psychological interventions to prevent depression in children and adolescents can be useful and with protective effects that last for up to a year, finds a new systematic review. According to research cited in the new review, in 2002, depression ranked second greatest cause of disability in developed countries and first in many developing ones. The review appears in the current issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates medical research.

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childhood bully

Children With Behavior Problems Are More Likely To Have Thoughts Of Suicide

Children who show early signs of problem behavior are more likely to have thought of killing or harming themselves, suggests new research in the latest issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health. Past research indicates that about 20 percent of adolescents have suicidal ideation, which includes having thoughts of suicide or some level of suicide planning. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranks suicide as the fourth leading cause of death in children between ages 10 and 13 from 1999 to 2007.

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Dr. Eliana Perrin

Few Parents Recall Being Told By Doctors That Their Child Is Overweight

A new analysis of national survey data finds that less than one-quarter of parents of overweight children recall ever being told by a doctor or other health care provider that their children were overweight. And although that percentage has increased over the last 10 years, more improvement is needed, said Eliana M. Perrin, MD, MPH, associate professor in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, pediatrician at North Carolina Children’s Hospital, and lead author of the study.

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