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a women with a migraine headache

The Role Of Perceived Triggers, Such As Alcohol And Certain Foods, Are Overestimated In Migraine Headache

Migraine is a neurovascular disease that affects about 15% of the western population. Compounds in foods and beverages (chocolate, wine, citrus, etc) considered as migraine triggers include tyramine, phenylethylamine, and possibly histamine and phenolic compounds. Avoiding those triggers may significantly reduce the frequency of migraines in some patients. However, only a small percentage of patients in one study became headache-free simply by excluding those foods. The publisher made the original, full-text study available for an undetermined length of time; check the end of this report for a download link.

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benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepine Abuse Treatment Admissions Have Tripled From 1998 To 2008

A new national study shows that from 1998 to 2008 (the most recent year with available figures) substance abuse treatment admissions among those 12 and older related to the abuse of benzodiazepine drugs rose from 22,400 in 1998 to approximately 60,200 in 2008. The report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows that while benzodiazepine related admissions represented only 3.2 percent of all substance abuse admissions among this population in 2008, it had grown from the 1.3 percent it represented in 1998. The full SAMHSA report is available for free; check the end of this post for a download link.

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Human Heart

New Study Illuminates The Impact Of Specific Lifestyle Variations On Hypertension

Evidence continues to build that lifestyle modifications help control blood pressure (BP) levels. Data evaluating the consumption of coffee and alcohol and the impact of low fitness levels will be presented at the American Society of Hypertension, Inc.’s 26th Annual Scientific Meeting and Exposition (ASH 2011) and will be featured in the May 22 ASH press briefing.

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a young teen with her laptop computer

Teenagers Who Consume Alcohol Spend More Time On Their Computers And Internet

Teenagers who drink alcohol spend more time on their computers for recreational use, including social networking and downloading and listening to music, compared with their peers who do not drink. Results of an anonymous survey of 264 teenagers were reported in the online edition of the journal Addictive Behaviors in a study authored by Weill Cornell Medical College public health researcher Dr. Jennifer Epstein.

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mixed drink

Mixed Energy-Alcohol Drinks May Be Riskier Than Drinking Alcohol Alone

Energy drinks mixed with alcohol, such as Red Bull™ and vodka, have become trendy. While this consumption has been implicated in risky drinking practices and associated accidents and injuries, there is little laboratory research on how the effects of this combination differ from those of drinking alcohol alone. A recent laboratory study, comparing measures of intoxication due to alcohol alone versus alcohol/energy drink, has found that the combination of the energy drink enhanced feelings of stimulation in participants. However, the energy drink did not change the level of impairment for impulsive behavior.

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DNA

Parental Alcoholism Carries A Genetic Risk To Offspring

Researchers know that there is a strong link between parental alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and the risk for developing an AUD among their offspring. This study looked at the risk of AUDs in the offspring of a large population-based sample of Danish parents. Findings confirmed that parental AUDs were associated with an increased risk of AUDs among the offspring.

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Insula

Impaired Impulsivity And Delayed Gratification In Alcohol-Dependence Is Associated With Specific Brain Anomalies

Researchers already know that alcohol dependence (AD) is strongly associated with impaired impulse control or, more precisely, the inability to choose large, delayed rewards rather than smaller but more immediate rewards. Findings from a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural basis of impulsive choice among individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) suggest that impulsive choice in AD may be the result of functional anomalies in widely distributed but interconnected brain regions that are involved in cognitive and emotional control.

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