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Many U.S. Physicians Believe Their Own Patients Receive Too Much Care

A survey of U.S. primary care physicians shows that many believe that their own patients are receiving too much medical care and many feel that malpractice reform, realignment of financial incentives and having more time with patients could reduce pressures on physicians to do more than they feel is needed, according to a report in the September 26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

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Reports Of Mental Health Disability Increase In The United States

The prevalence of self-reported mental health disabilities increased in the U.S. among non-elderly adults during the last decade, according to a study by Ramin Mojtabai, MD, PhD, of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. At the same time, the study found the prevalence of disability attributed to other chronic conditions decreased, while the prevalence of significant mental distress remained unchanged. The findings will appear in the November edition of the American Journal of Public Health.

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Medication

U.S. Public May Not Be Aware Of Important Uncertainties About Drug Benefits and Harms, But Explaining These Uncertainties Might Improve Their Choices

Many U.S. adults believe that only extremely effective drugs without serious adverse effects are approved, but providing explanations to patients highlighting uncertainties about drug benefits may affect their choices, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The article is part of the journal’s Less Is More series. Approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not necessarily ensure that a drug has a large or important benefit, or that all serious adverse effects of the drug are known, according to background information in the article.

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anti-depressant medication

Only 1 In 5 Medicaid-Covered Kids In Ohio Finish Antidepressant Medication Treatment

About half of Medicaid-covered children and adolescents in Ohio who are in treatment for depression complete their first three months of prescribed antidepressants, and only one-fifth complete the recommended minimum six-month course of drugs to treat depression, new research suggests. Among those at the highest risk for not completing treatment are adolescents – as opposed to younger children – and minority youths, particularly African Americans, according to the analysis of Medicaid prescription data over a three-year period.

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U.S. Capitol

APA Responds To Proposed Rule On 2012 Medicare Fee Schedule

As part of psychology’s ongoing effort to fight for the interests of the profession through the ongoing challenges facing Medicare reimbursement, American Psychological Association (APA) recently responded to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule on the 2012 Medicare fee schedule.  Included in this report is a link to the comment letter.

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Burnout And Work/Life Dissatisfaction Commonly Reported By Internal Medicine Residents

In a study that included nearly three-fourths of all internal medicine residents in the U.S. in a recent academic year, suboptimal quality-of-life and dissatisfaction with work-life balance were commonly reported, as were burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion, which were associated with higher levels of educational debt, according to a study in the September 7 issue of JAMA, a medical education theme issue.

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Study Finds Some Hospitalized Children Exposed To Many Medications And Therapeutic Agents

Some hospitalized pediatric patients, particularly those with rare conditions, may be exposed to many drugs and therapeutic agents, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. According to background information in the article, many drugs used for children in the hospital setting do not have well-established pediatric efficacy and safety profiles. Some medication use in this population is for off-label indications.

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Justin Trogdon, PhD

Medical Expenses Related To Obesity Costs States Billions

States spend up to $15 billion a year in medical expenses related to obesity, according to a new study by researchers at RTI International, Duke University, and the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The study, published online in Obesity, updates 2004 state-by-state estimates of obesity-attributable medical expenditures. The report also provides rough estimates of the share of obesity expenditures in each state that are funded by taxpayers through Medicare and Medicaid.

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