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an angry adolescent

‘Modelling Emotions’ Is A Potential New Therapy For Disturbed Teenagers

Researchers at The University of Nottingham are to investigate whether the therapeutic effects of clay modelling could help disturbed teenagers deal with their feelings of anger, anxiety, and depression. Academics are teaming up with professionals in the NHS (National Health Service), Nottingham Contemporary art gallery, and local artists for the innovative project that will look at the potential benefits that clay could offer to young people struggling with mental health problems.

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Crushed Cigarette

Cigarette Smoking Linked To Heightened Chronic Pain

Smokers are much more likely to report problems with persistent musculoskeletal pain than non-smokers, according to a new study reported in the Journal of Pain, published by the American Pain Society. Researchers from the University of Kentucky School of Public Health surveyed more than 6000 women participating in the Kentucky Women’s Health Registry, which regularly polls women on health-related issues to better understand the state’s disease burden. The study was intended to assess the association of smoking with the presence of different types of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

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designer drug

New Tests For “Legal Marijuana,” “Bath Salts” and Other Emerging Designer Drugs

Scientists today reported development of much needed new tests to help cope with a wave of deaths, emergency room visits and other problems from a new genre of designer drugs sold legally in stores and online that mimic the effects of cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana. They spoke at the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held here this week.

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children in class

School Support For Children With ADHD May Miss The Mark – Inattention Vs. Hyperactivity

New research from the University of Montreal shows that inattention, rather than hyperactivity, is the most important indicator when it comes to finishing a high school education. “Children with attention problems need preventative intervention early in their development,” explained lead author Dr. Jean-Baptiste Pingault, who is also affiliated with Sainte-Justine Mother and Child University Hospital. The researchers came to their conclusion after looking at data collected from the parents and teachers of 2000 children over a period of almost twenty years.

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Reseacher Madhukar Trivedi

Physical Training Can Substitute Effectively As Second ‘Medication’ For People Diagnosed With Depression

Exercise can be as effective as a second medication for as many as half of depressed patients whose condition have not been cured by a single antidepressant medication. UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists involved in the investigation, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, found that both moderate and intense levels of daily exercise can work as well as administering a second antidepressant drug, which is often used when initial medications don’t move patients to remission. The type of exercise needed, however, depends on the characteristics of patients, including their gender.

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a stressed girl

Stress Can Impair Future Offspring, But Can Also Improve Resilience In Animal Model

The study found that stress experienced by young female rats can impair their future offspring, but can also improve resilience. The study also showed that providing the young stressed females with an enriched environment (often used to model therapy), can indeed ameliorate some of the effects. “The similarities between rats and humans raise the question of whether similar effects might transpire in humans; for example, exposure to war or natural disasters might have heritable effects,” explains Prof. Micah Leshem who headed the study.

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a close up of an face and eye

Reduced Recognition Of Fear And Sadness In Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Facial expressions convey strong cues for someone’s emotional state and the ability to interpret these cues is crucial in social interaction. This ability is known to be compromised in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as social anxiety or Korsakoff’s syndrome. New research has now revealed evidence that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is also characterized by changes in the way the brain processes specific emotions and that certain aspects of this disorder could be understood as a consequence of the altered processing of emotional cues.

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Low DHA Levels Linked To Suicide Risk Among U.S. Military Personnel

A new study suggests that low levels of the highly unsaturated omega-3 essential fatty acids, in particular DHA, may be associated with increased risk of suicide. Researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) and the National Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (NIAAA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) drew this finding following analysis of a large random sampling of suicide deaths among U.S. military personnel on active-duty between 2002 and 2008. The results of this retrospective study appear in the August 23 online version of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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