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Archive | Traumatic Injury

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New, Inexpensive Device Provides Visual Computer Control For Those With Physical Disabilities

Millions of people suffering from Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injuries or amputees could soon interact with their computers and surroundings using just their eyes, thanks to a new device that costs less than £40 (approximately $62.00). Included in this report is a video demonstration of this new device as well as a link to download the original, full-text study.

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demonstration of nerve transfer

Surgeons Restore Limited Hand Function To A Quadriplegic Patient

Surgeons at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored some hand function in a quadriplegic patient with a spinal cord injury at the C7 vertebra, the lowest bone in the neck. Instead of operating on the spine itself, the surgeons rerouted working nerves in the upper arms. These nerves still “talk” to the brain because they attach to the spine above the injury.

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children playing soccer

Frequent “Heading” In Soccer Can Lead To Brain Injury And Cognitive Impairment

Using advanced imaging techniques and cognitive tests, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein, have shown that repeatedly heading a soccer ball increases the risk for brain injury and cognitive impairment. The imaging portion of the findings was presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in Chicago. Included in this report is a video summary of the study results.

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football

Routine Head Hits In School Sports May Cause Undetected Brain Injury

The brain scans of high school football and hockey players showed subtle injury – even if they did not suffer a concussion – after taking routine hits to the head during the normal course of play, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study. The research is preliminary, involving a small sample of athletes, but nonetheless raises powerful questions about the consequences of the mildest head injury among youths with developing brains, said lead author Jeffrey Bazarian, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of Emergency Medicine at URMC with a special interest in sports concussions.

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Journal of Neurotrauma

Headaches Are Common In Year Following Traumatic Brain Injury, Especially Among Females

Recurring headaches are common during the year following a traumatic brain injury (TBI), regardless of the severity of the TBI, and they tend to occur more often among females and those with a pre-TBI history of headache, according to an article in Journal of Neurotrauma, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. The article is available free online at the link below.

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a participant involved in the eeg cap study

Brain Cap Technology Turns Thought Into Motion With Potential To Bring Life-Changing Technology To People With Mobile Impairments

“Brain cap” technology being developed at the University of Maryland allows users to turn their thoughts into motion. Associate Professor of Kinesiology José ‘Pepe’ L. Contreras-Vidal and his team have created a non-invasive, sensor-lined cap with neural interface software that soon could be used to control computers, robotic prosthetic limbs, motorized wheelchairs and even digital avatars. Included in this report is a video interview with several of the researchers involved in this interesting line of research.

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human stem cells

Stem Cells Restore Cognitive Abilities Impaired By Brain Cancer Treatment

Human neural stem cells are capable of helping people regain learning and memory abilities lost due to radiation treatment for brain tumors, a UC Irvine study suggests. Research with rats found that stem cells transplanted two days after cranial irradiation restored cognitive function as measured in one- and four-month assessments. In contrast, irradiated rats not treated with stem cells showed no cognitive improvement.

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